Varun Bhave

Class of 2015


proconapril2015(2)

Pro: Should personal prerogatives be respected when they infringe on religious practices?

It might be considerate or thoughtful for a woman to give up her airplane seat if she finds herself next to an ultra-Orthodox, or Hasidic Jewish man whose religion forbids close contact with a woman not his spouse, but mandating the accommodation would be coercive. Although recent flight delays and disruptions caused by ultra-Orthodox Jewish men refusing to sit next to women have sparked significant debate, the underlying question is fairly straightforward: Given that personal preferences will inevitably conflict, what does it mean to wrong someone?  Denying a person the entitlement to force someone else to give up a seat ...
falc art flag ban

Pro: Should it be legal to ban the American flag on college campuses?

Free speech cannot be curtailed merely because people are offended. The attempt by students at the University of California, Irvine to ban the display of flags prompted backlash from veterans, state legislators and UCI Chancellor Howard Gillman. The flag is a powerful symbol that holds special significance for many Americans. But responses like California state senator Janet Nguyen’s proposed amendment to the state constitution to block public universities from banning the flag undercut American ideals far more than any flag ban could. To most, the flag represents freedom and democracy. But what symbols represent...
organs

Con: Legalizing sale of nonvital organs for transplant

There are many government policies that could increase the supply of transplantable organs, but creating a legal market for organ sales is probably the worst option.  Although such a policy could certainly save lives, the commodification of the human body is a steep price to pay. The system would disproportionately benefit patients who can afford the costs of live donor organs. When patients compete for the same organ, the bidding war will favor the wealthiest recipients. An organ market could jumpstart a trend in which people in lower-income groups are incentivized to give up organs, but lose out to the rich in t...
436A3246

Personal Perspective: Varun Bhave

Most people on the Falconer staff, Know me as a serious person, Amicable but pop-culture illiterate, With chronic absence syndrome — it’s begun to worsen. So you’d think this story would reflect, On my “growth” in the last four years, Sprinkled with touching anecdotes,  Ending with college aspirations or fears. I have written humorous poetry since elementary school. My favorite authors — like Roald Dahl or A.A. Milne — wrote in alternating prose and verse. Bollywood movies taught me that even the most somber moments can benefit from a dose of rhythm. And I bough...
assistedsuicide

Con: Morality of Assisted Suicide

It seems intuitive that certain people, like the terminally ill, would be better off if they could choose to die with dignity and alleviate their unnecessary suffering. However, the issues of human dignity and suicide are far more complex than advocates of physician-assisted suicide understand. It is unethical to will your own death for the sake of some subordinate end, even the cessation of pain or comfort of your loved ones.  As a human being, you are the sort of object for whom things can be good or bad. An engrossing movie is not intrinsically good. It is good for viewers because they impose value upon certain characte...
sintax

Pro: Sin Tax

It would be coercive if the law forced people to perform the right actions, but it should still shape their choices. Although people who engage in smoking, drinking or unhealthy eating bear most of the consequences for their own choices, sin taxes maintain accountability for the negative externalities associated with self-destructive behavior. Even if the taxes were ineffective, they at least promote a choice architecture that penalizes people for indirectly hurting others. Smokers might pay for their own medical problems, but are rarely responsible for the harm inflicted by secondhand smoke. In addition, the examples people se...
football2

Football shuts out El Camino

    The TPHS football team (4-4) overpowered El Camino High School (5-3) on Oct. 24, shutting out the home team 14-0 with a dominant defensive front. After stopping the Wildcats’ opening drive, the Falcons advanced into El Camino territory, helped by a 15-yard Oceanside face mask penalty. However, the Falcons failed to capitalize, going three-and-out on their next two possessions and “strugg[ling] to run the football,” according to head coach Ron Gladnick. “We were trying to put together drives all through the first half, but just couldn’t finish,&rd...
pROCn

Con: Reparations for Slavery

Black Americans deserve compensation to make up for their relative lack of wealth or social mobility, but can such a policy be justified as a way of remedying past wrongdoing? From this perspective, slave reparations are neither a moral requirement nor a practical possibility. Reparations raise many questions about collective responsibility, since it is difficult to isolate genuinely collective wrongs from individual harms committed by individual people. The vast majority of Americans do not descend from Southern slaveholders, making it strange to insist that everyone pay for reparations through tax dollars. But it would also be ...
football

Falcons claw Wolverines 42-14

The TPHS football team (1-3) defeated the Westview High School Wolverines (1-3) 42-14 on Sept. 19, picking up its first victory of the season with a strong rushing attack and tenacious defense. The Falcons made a statement in their opening possession, chewing up five minutes on an 80-yard drive that saw long runs by Christian Gange (12) and Murray Kim (11) and was capped by a 2-yard touchdown push by Quinn Morimoto (12). “Having so many able-bodied backs adept at gaining yards was important,” offensive lineman Brian Wahl (12) said. “They were each good in their own aspects — like inside runs or outside runs — and it made sur...