Category: Feature

Emily Morgan

1 in 3000: Emily Morgan

Emily Morgan (12) spends her afternoons at a table that is "completely covered" in paint. The AP Studio Art student decompresses from the stress of school in a room in her house that has been turned into a makeshift art studio, where she works on watercolor paintings, ink drawings and most recently, illustrations for a children’s book. "I like painting people because it’s easiest to tell a story when there’s an actual character," Morgan said. Two years ago at her church, Morgan met a woman who often paints her interpretation of the lesson in front of the congregation. After painting with her, Morgan was approached by a woman named...
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Domestic Violence

As chief of surgery at the University of California San Francisco, Fresno, in a community littered with gang activity and farming accidents, trauma surgeon Jim Davis has seen his fair share of violence. But Fresno’s medical center hosts countless domestic violence victims every week as well. "I have seen people come in murdered and grievously injured through domestic violence," Davis said. "I’ve seen people hit by cars, whips, knives, anything you could imagine. I’ve done a couple of research projects looking at what doctors know about domestic violence, and the answer is [they do not know] very much." But in a community as afflue...
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Violence in the Media

The eyes of a nation are glued to the screen. Broadcast on every television is a gruesome battle for survival. Simply for the entertainment of a corrupt government and a desensitized society, innocent children are forced to fight one another to the death until there is only one left alive in the arena. Millions of people were drawn to "The Hunger Games" franchise, despite the inhumane events that were brought to life through the film and novels. Violence in the media is often overlooked because of the attraction and hype of movies and video games. "I was horrified during ‘The Hunger Games,’ where there was murder of children," TPH...
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Asides: November

Last week, seeking refuge from the usual commotion of the media center after school — textbook-snatching eighth-graders, noisy freshmen blasting "Gangnam Style" on the three available computers, giggling couples frolicking to and fro — I retreated into the musty bookshelves while anxiously awaiting my ride home. After an hour of quiet productivity, I raised my head from my nearly finished notes on the Byzantine Empire and spotted The Works of T.S. Eliot on a shelf nearby. Seemingly out of its own accord, my hand reached out to tug the grubby book that was sandwiched uncomfortably between its dejected brothers. I wondered when thes...
Whaley House

Ghost Watch

With a quaint white fence on the balcony and green window shutters adorning its brick facade, 2476 San Diego Avenue appears to be an ordinary home. But, a closer look at the Whaley House history reveals that the hanging of alleged thief James "Yankee Jim" Robinson and the suicide of publicly humiliated Violet Whaley occurred on site, leading some to believe the house is "haunted." According to the Whaley House Director of Interpretive Services Victor Santana, Robinson was convicted of grand larceny in 1852 when he stole a rowboat with his accomplices. Robinson was captured and hanged shortly thereafter on the property where the Wha...
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Mind the Gap

The British are coming! The British are coming! From colonial fashion of the late 1700s, to the musical British Invasion of the 1960s, to following Kate Middleton’s every wardrobe choice and waiting in line for One Direction presale tickets, Americans have enjoyed a long tradition of immersing themselves in every facet of British culture. "I completely love the royal family," Gabi Arriaga (11) said. "They’re so useless, but so cute. I wish the United States had a royal family." According to the Huffington Post, 23 million Americans watched the royal wedding last year. ABCNews.com, despite not having exclusive coverage of the event...
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Escape to Neverland

You remember weekend morning cartoon marathons. The bowl of CocoPuffs in your hand. Sounds nice right now, doesn’t it? Wish you could go back? Well, some TPHS students never left. Cartoons provide them a sense of comfort and teach simple yet valuable life lessons. Dacoda Strack (12) still watches animated television shows "Adventure Time with Finn and Jake" and "The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack," and finds pleasure in the fact that they are set in a different world, yet are still relatable. "I think another reason students are still interested in [childhood pastimes] is pure nostalgia, just because it’s so nice to think ab...
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Hit and Run: Violence in Athletics

Media mogul Ted Turner once remarked that sports were "like a war without the killing." According to running back and defensive end Chase Pickwell (12), football is indeed very much like war. Pickwell attributes many of the parallels to the mentality necessary for those involved. "You like to defend your teammates," Pickwell said. "There are times when [the other team] hits someone, and you go out to try to hit that kid to get back later in the game." Head football coach Scott Ashby recognizes the parallels between war and football — namely contact at the line of scrimmage — but said all correlation stops there. "People playing f...
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A Higher Power

TPHS may not have Wednesday Mass like Cathedral Catholic High School or Tefillah like the San Diego Jewish Academy, but students still find ways to practice their religion on campus, even if the school cannot promote faith. Robert Stucky (12), president of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, said he believes students should be able to freely practice their religion at school, as long as they are not "shoving it down anyone’s throat." "For me, religion gives me hope. Everyone has their goals in life, but I believe a lot of things aren’t that worthwhile," Stucky said. "But I see hope in Jesus and knowing that when I die, if I put ...
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Shopaholics Anonymous

"I definitely shop more than the average girl does," Kristin Butler (10) said. Many consider shopping to be a social activity, but for some it interferes with the rest of their lives. Even if self-proclaimed shopaholic Gabi Arriaga (11) is in her pajamas at midnight, she still finds a way to avidly surf the web and purchase band merchandise. Others who shop frequently insist on seeing clothes in person and are more selective about who they will go with, knowing that their companions do not usually have the stamina they do. "I’m usually dragging [my friends] on ... I [go] to Nordstrom for an hour. Then, I’ll still have to hit up t...