Category: Opinion

security cameras(2)

Staff Ed: Security Cameras are helpful but unnecessary

A member of the TPHS Foundation recently suggested using some of the $313,444 the foundation raised this year to install security cameras on and around the school campus. The topic of security cameras on school property fuels a debate about students’ privacy versus security, as well as the cost of the maintenance and installation of the devices. However, the use of surveillance is a rational solution to many of the issues schools like TPHS face every day. As the world rapidly moves further into a digital age, a substantial number of teenagers now have cell phones with cameras and because of this, privacy, es...
Pipeline-Litzlbeck

Pro: Fracking

Since the late 1900s, the U.S. has grown increasingly reliant on a new,  advantageous method of extracting natural gas from shale — or layers of rock — called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which involves digging a well several thousand meters underground, where it is then bent 90 degrees horizontally. After the drill pipes are replaced with steel, a fracturing fluid is pumped under high pressure to widen fractures in rocks, creating tiny openings that release the trapped gas. According to the Environment America Research and Policy Center and the U.S. Energy Information Administration, 82,000 fracking wells ...
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Tomi Lahren should not have been suspended from The Blaze

Tomi Lahren is best known for being an outspoken young Republican woman. However on Mar. 17, during a guest appearance on “The View,” Lahren said women should have access to abortion and accused people who held pro-life positions of being hypocritical for claiming to want limited government yet supporting anti-abortion legislation.  This caused her to be suspended with pay from The Blaze, the conservative multi-platform news and entertainment network that hosts her TV show, “Tomi.” Even though she was not fired, Lahren filed a lawsuit on April 7 for wrongful termination. According to the New Y...
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Legislation for air passenger rights should be enacted following United Airlines incident

On April 9, David Dao, a doctor from Kentucky, was dragged off a United Airlines flight departing O’Hare International Airport in Chicago for Louisville, Ky. after refusing to give up his seat on the plane. Looking for seats for four of its employees, the airline asked if any passengers would be willing to get off the flight and guaranteed compensation for their tickets in return. When none stepped forward, airline officials randomly picked four passengers to leave the plane, and Dao was one of them. Dao told the officials that he could not deplane because he had “patients waiting for [him] in Louisville” which ...
Pipeline-Litzlbeck

Con: Fracking

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is the process of drilling deep into the Earth and injecting water, sand and chemicals at high pressures to extract natural gas from rock. While fracking can be economically beneficial, as it creates jobs and extracts oil for relatively low prices, the process is very harmful to the environment and increases our dependence on a limited supply of fossil fuels. Corporate influence in legislation is one of the biggest threats to air and water quality and has paved the way for increased fracking. A handful of oil and gas companies like ExxonMobil and Koch Industries have funded projects seek...
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Trump should attend White House Correspondents’ Dinner

The annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner is an event where journalists, celebrities and politicians come together to honor outstanding journalists, as well as award scholarships and grants to rising journalistic stars. Over time, the dinner has incorporated what is now the customary comedy routine, where the president of the U.S. delivers a comedic speech, and then a famous comedian takes over to make fun of the president and his administration. The proceeds raised from the tickets for the dinner and other fundraising activities during the event go to fund the scholarships and grants for the next year. ...
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Personal Perspective: Amanda Chen

When I was in fourth grade, my teacher assigned our class a project where we had to make collegiate-style banners for our “dream schools.” Naturally, I picked Harvard. When the banners were hung up on the classroom wall, one of my classmates quickly pointed out that I had missed one “r,” so that it instead read “Havard.” I was mortified. “How are you going into Harvard if you can’t even spell it correctly?” they laughed. Turns out, they were completely right. I didn’t get into Harvard. And as pretty much anyone I’ve ever held a conversation via text...
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Personal Perspective: Maya Kota

My sense of humor has become solely defined by my intentional mispronunciation of words. It started a few months ago when my mom asked me if I wanted to eat a tangerine. I responded with, “You mean a tang-er-rye-nee, right?” And to my surprise, she went along with it and said: “Yeah, that’s what I mean.” My mom and dad put up with a lot of weird things I say and do, and I think that’s why they’ve become my best friends. I’ve never been the most outgoing or talkative of people; my sister was usually the one to be out on weekends while I stayed home watching Shark Tank with my...
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Personal Perspective: Sammy Hallal

My dad came to the U.S., alone, at the age of 17 with nothing but a single suitcase, in search of a better life. In pursuit of the American dream, he left his home and culture behind, and stepped into a land he knew almost nothing about.  Sixteen years later, he would go on to marry my mother, and they would later move to San Diego, where I have lived my entire life.  Both of my parents grew up in the small country of Lebanon during a devastating 16- year war. They spent their childhoods evading bullets and seeking cover from the constant shelling; I spent the first years of my life lounging in the upper-class n...
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Staff Ed: UC Out-of-State Cap Will Help California Student Residents

To many Californian students, the University of California system is a friendly beacon in the treacherous and unknown sea of college acceptances. It is thought that because those residing in California pay taxes to support and fund the UC schools, college applicants from the Golden State should have a higher admissions priority than those from outside the state. The recent proposal by UC officials of a 20 percent cap on out-of-state undergraduate students was the result of public pressure from parents, who feel their children have been shut out of the schools funded by their tax dollars, and the students themselves. ...