Category: Opinion

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Personal Perspective: Maya Kota

My sense of humor has become solely defined by my intentional mispronunciation of words. It started a few months ago when my mom asked me if I wanted to eat a tangerine. I responded with, “You mean a tang-er-rye-nee, right?” And to my surprise, she went along with it and said: “Yeah, that’s what I mean.” My mom and dad put up with a lot of weird things I say and do, and I think that’s why they’ve become my best friends. I’ve never been the most outgoing or talkative of people; my sister was usually the one to be out on weekends while I stayed home watching Shark Tank with my...
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Personal Perspective: Sammy Hallal

My dad came to the U.S., alone, at the age of 17 with nothing but a single suitcase, in search of a better life. In pursuit of the American dream, he left his home and culture behind, and stepped into a land he knew almost nothing about.  Sixteen years later, he would go on to marry my mother, and they would later move to San Diego, where I have lived my entire life.  Both of my parents grew up in the small country of Lebanon during a devastating 16- year war. They spent their childhoods evading bullets and seeking cover from the constant shelling; I spent the first years of my life lounging in the upper-class n...
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Staff Ed: UC Out-of-State Cap Will Help California Student Residents

To many Californian students, the University of California system is a friendly beacon in the treacherous and unknown sea of college acceptances. It is thought that because those residing in California pay taxes to support and fund the UC schools, college applicants from the Golden State should have a higher admissions priority than those from outside the state. The recent proposal by UC officials of a 20 percent cap on out-of-state undergraduate students was the result of public pressure from parents, who feel their children have been shut out of the schools funded by their tax dollars, and the students themselves. ...
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President Trump Wrongfully Undermines Journalistic Integrity

Being a part of the Falconer, or any news outlet, means reporting every story accurately and fairly. It means writing unbiased, well-informed and straightforward news stories. It also means having to constantly listen to people, whether they are peers, administrators, teachers or President Donald Trump, condemn reporters for being “dishonest” and blame news outlets when they report the truth. On Feb. 24, reporters from CNN, the New York Times, Politico, the Los Angeles Times, the BBC, the Huffington Post, the Guardian and Buzzfeed were banned from attending a non-televised briefing held by White House press se...
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President Trump’s Attacks on Media Endanger American Democracy

Democracies can only be sustained with a system of checks and balances on government action.  In the U.S., democratic stability is protected by the three branches of government and the right to free speech and press. Political expression and dissent give power to citizens and allow them to communicate to their elected officials. Although it may not be immediately apparent, the news media, entertainment and political satire all play a role in the preservation of a democratic society. Citizens can only make informed decisions regarding issues that affect them with access to the facts of those issues. President Trump’s at...
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Recent Protests have the Power to Influence Political Change

Since President Donald Trump took office on Jan. 20, his weeks in the White House have been defined by widespread protest and opposition. Just one day into his presidency, an estimated 470,000 people participated in the Women’s March on Washington. Over 3 million people attended “sister marches” that took place in 60 countries and on every continent, including Antarctica, according to estimates by local organizers. After Trump issued his controversial Muslim ban, and yes, it was a Muslim ban, thousands of people flooded airports across the nation to stand in solidarity with refugees and travelers from th...
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Con: Standing Up for the Pledge of Allegiance

The right not to have to stand up for the pledge is one protected under the  free speech clause in the U.S. Constitution — not one that can be sacrificed because over-patriotic citizens feel the need to impose their views on their peers. The idea that not standing up for the pledge is somehow dishonoring those serving in the military is unfounded, baseless, and frankly, ridiculous. It is nothing more than an attempt by others to force people to believe what they believe, to stand for what they stand for, and to ignore constitutional rights.  Students have been classically conditioned to stand up at...
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Pro: Standing Up for the Pledge of Allegiance

Each morning in schools across the nation, before classes start and the school day begins, students stand together with their right hands over their hearts and recite the words that show their loyalty to the United States of America. Even kindergarteners learn the pledge and are expected to recite it each day at school. The pledge, which was written by Francis Bellamy at Christian socialist magazine owner Daniel Sharp Ford’s request, was written to promote patriotism in the U.S. and strengthen national unity. American flags were placed in every school across the country, and today all citizens in school continue to recite t...
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Ban on California Offshore Drilling Should be Permanent

California Gov. Jerry Brown asked President Obama in a Dec. 2016 letter to ban new offshore oil drilling in California. Obama has already issued a permanent bans on new drilling in Atlantic and Arctic waters and a temporary ban on new West Coast offshore drilling until 2022. While banning something that endangers the environment and possibly the entire human race may seem scary at first, a ban on new California drilling is the right move. The continued reliance to oil is not in California’s best interest. More oil platforms usually mean more oil spills, and oil spills have been devastating in the past. In 1969, a Santa Ba...

Personal Perspective: Anvitha Soordelu

If you’ve ever met me, chances are, I’ve only said about 10 words to you. Maybe 20. Probably something along the lines of “Is this what we’re supposed to be doing?” Maybe we engaged in small talk, discussing the night’s homework or stressing over that one problem on that one test that nobody understood how to do, before the conversation petered out into its usual silence. I’ve always been a quiet person. Since day one actually, or so I’ve been told. At age four I was quiet, shy and avoided conflicts with anybody who wasn’t immediate family. This was also true of me at age ...