Category: Opinion

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Trump must condemn authoritarian leaders who violate human rights

In the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte is waging a deadly war on drug users. In Russia, Putin is restricting the citizens’ freedom of expression. In The Democratic People’s of Korea, Kim Jong-Un is holding tens of thousands of political enemies in prison camps. Donald Trump must respond to human rights violations like these as a part of his new job as President of the United States. For years, presidents have punished leaders that violate human rights. Barack Obama did so through refusing to talk with Kim and Obama and George Bush have placed sanctions on countries that violate human rights as a way of is...
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Backlash against Obama’s Wall Street speeches is hypocritical

Former President Barack Obama has been suffering backlash for agreeing to give for-profit speeches on Wall Street now that he is no longer president but a private citizen. Obama is set to receive $400,000 for his appearance at an event organized by Wall Street firm Cantor Fitzgerald. Upon first hearing, the amount he charges for a single public appearance might appear exorbitant, especially when compared to how much others of a similar caliber have charged in the past. For each of his appearances, George W. Bush only charged between $150,000 and $175,000, which is less than half of what Obama is charging.  Bu...
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Dear Liberals: Don’t be too happy about the French Election

On May 7, the day of the French election, millions of moderates and leftists around the world found themselves breathing a sigh of relief as Emmanuel Macron emerged victorious; however, this “victory” is not as great as it seems. Macron, a centrist with socially liberal views and a member of the En Marche! Party, faced Marine Le Pen, a far-right populist candidate and leader of the National Front Party. Le Pen, through skillful campaigning and her natural ability to deceive, managed to transform her father’s fascist group into a credible and quickly growing party. Following in the footsteps of Presiden...
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Personal Perspective: Irene Yu

You might know me as that girl that has changed a lot since elementary school, or the girl that complimented your outfit in the bathroom or the girl that you never agreed with in your history class. You might know me because the shoes I wear every day make loud noises in the hallways, or because you’ve been in classes with me since middle school or just because you’re friends with Julian. No matter how you know me, I can guarantee you that I’ve given extensive thought to what you must think about me – whether that’s over the span of a few days, a few hours or just a few minutes, as you walk by me in ...
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Con: Standardized Tests

In the past few weeks, many Advanced Placement students got too few hours of sleep, drank too much coffee and studied, arguably, too hard. A week from now, most students will be doing the same thing for finals. What makes all this testing so important? Testing has been around for a long time, but in 2002 the United States increased its focus on standardized tests under the No Child Left Behind Act, which mandated standardized testing in all 50 states to measure student learning. However, the push for increased standardized testing has not changed results very much. In fact, there is an apparent racial achievement ...
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Pro: Standardized Tests

Pencils, specifically those with the infamous “#2” stamped on the side in metallic green type, sit on the desks of millions of students throughout the country. The signal echoes throughout the nation; “You may begin,” and every pencil, no matter the proficiency or status of the student, is picked up. At the end of the session, the pencil, worn and tired, is the only remnant of the process these students have just gone through — standardized testing. After the No Child Left Behind Act was passed in 2002, mandating standardized testing in all 50 states, the question of whether or not students i...
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Staff Ed: Security Cameras are helpful but unnecessary

A member of the TPHS Foundation recently suggested using some of the $313,444 the foundation raised this year to install security cameras on and around the school campus. The topic of security cameras on school property fuels a debate about students’ privacy versus security, as well as the cost of the maintenance and installation of the devices. However, the use of surveillance is a rational solution to many of the issues schools like TPHS face every day. As the world rapidly moves further into a digital age, a substantial number of teenagers now have cell phones with cameras and because of this, privacy, es...
Pipeline-Litzlbeck

Pro: Fracking

Since the late 1900s, the U.S. has grown increasingly reliant on a new,  advantageous method of extracting natural gas from shale — or layers of rock — called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which involves digging a well several thousand meters underground, where it is then bent 90 degrees horizontally. After the drill pipes are replaced with steel, a fracturing fluid is pumped under high pressure to widen fractures in rocks, creating tiny openings that release the trapped gas. According to the Environment America Research and Policy Center and the U.S. Energy Information Administration, 82,000 fracking wells ...
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Tomi Lahren should not have been suspended from The Blaze

Tomi Lahren is best known for being an outspoken young Republican woman. However on Mar. 17, during a guest appearance on “The View,” Lahren said women should have access to abortion and accused people who held pro-life positions of being hypocritical for claiming to want limited government yet supporting anti-abortion legislation.  This caused her to be suspended with pay from The Blaze, the conservative multi-platform news and entertainment network that hosts her TV show, “Tomi.” Even though she was not fired, Lahren filed a lawsuit on April 7 for wrongful termination. According to the New Y...
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Legislation for air passenger rights should be enacted following United Airlines incident

On April 9, David Dao, a doctor from Kentucky, was dragged off a United Airlines flight departing O’Hare International Airport in Chicago for Louisville, Ky. after refusing to give up his seat on the plane. Looking for seats for four of its employees, the airline asked if any passengers would be willing to get off the flight and guaranteed compensation for their tickets in return. When none stepped forward, airline officials randomly picked four passengers to leave the plane, and Dao was one of them. Dao told the officials that he could not deplane because he had “patients waiting for [him] in Louisville” which ...